Strikes a chord....

Mathematician Cracks Mystery Beatles Chord:

It's the most famous chord in rock 'n' roll, an instantly recognizable twang rolling through the open strings on George Harrison's 12-string Rickenbacker. It evokes a Pavlovian response from music fans as they sing along to the refrain that follows:

It's been a hard day's night
And I've been working like a dog

The opening chord to A Hard Day's Night is also famous because for 40 years, no one quite knew exactly what chord Harrison was playing. Musicians, scholars and amateur guitar players alike had all come up with their own theories, but it took a Dalhousie mathematician to figure out the exact formula.

OK, that is all very nice - but: where is the chord!? I want to play it. Now. Come on, don't be selfish - publish it somewhere online for all of us!

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Haha! They found the notes using a Fourier Transform. A sophomore physics major could have done that!

"Mysterious" or not, it's hideously dissonant and harsh.