Stuff I showed on my panel at AAAS

Since I don't do PowerPoint but use the Web for presentations instead, and since the recordings from AAAS are not free (yes, you can buy them, I won't), and since some people have asked me to show what I showed at my panel there, here is the list of websites I showed there. I opened them up all in reverse chronological order beforehand, so during the presentation itself all I needed to do was close each window as I was done with it to reveal the next window underneath.

I started with http://www.scienceonline2010.com/ to explain the new interactive, collaborative methods in science journalism we discussed there.

Then I showed this series of tweets:
http://twitter.com/cassierodenberg/status/8119288328
http://twitter.com/BoraZ/statuses/8119311288
http://twitter.com/cassierodenberg/status/8120191410
http://twitter.com/BoraZ/statuses/8120374985
http://twitter.com/cassierodenberg/status/8120268454
http://twitter.com/cassierodenberg/status/8813079426
as an example of how that system can work:
http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2010/01/hints_on_how_science_journalis.php

I then showed how I filter my Twitter stream to eliminate much of it and only get to see what people I trust deem important:
http://twittertim.es/BoraZ
http://bora-science.hourlypress.com/
http://bora-media.hourlypress.com/

I pointed out that some people got jobs on Twitter:
http://younglandis.wordpress.com/2010/01/01/firstpost/

I showed how some people - including myself - got jobs on their blogs:
http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/04/i_want_this_job.php
http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/04/i_want_this_job.php#comment-410506
http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/05/its_official_1.php

Then I showed an example of a PLoS ONE paper, as a center of an ecosystem, and the comments and links as an outer shell of that ecosystem:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0005723
http://www.plosone.org/article/related/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0005723;jsessionid=2009BD9E7195AADA6D62474B19ABA3FE

I particularly showed the links to the blog posts aggregated on http://researchblogging.org/ to show the reputability of science blogging in the current science publishing ecosystem.

Then I discussed http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2009/04/new_journalistic_workflow.php
and as example showed how I collect important links about Dunbar Number from Twitter to FriendFeed for a future blog-post:
http://friendfeed.com/search?q=%22tag%3A+Dunbar%22
A blog-post or a series of them can lead to an MSM article, and perhaps a series of articles can lead to a book contract. But even without that, one can potentially have a blog post published in a book, e.g., in the Open Laboratory:

http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-open-laboratory-the-best-science-writing-on-blogs-2007/2234830

Finally, if one gets a book published, there is nobody organizing the marketing and the book tours any more, so I showed how Rebecca Skloot organized it herself, by tapping into her online community:
http://scienceblogs.com/culturedish/
http://rebeccaskloot.com/events/

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