Teeth and a marsupial lion

Chris Nedin has another post of great interest (even if it is for a late period, the Pleistocene) which goes into my file of "the older naturalists were great observers", as he shows how modern chemistry supports Richard Owens' diagnosis of Thylacoleo as a carnivore, even though it is in a clade of herbivores.

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A restoration of the skull of Thylacoleo. From The Ancient Life History of the Earth.Without a doubt, the extinct marsupial predator Thylacoleo was one of the strangest carnivorous mammals ever to have evolved. This predator from ancient Australia did not have piercing canines but instead bit into…
Restoration of the skull of Thylacoleo. From The Ancient Life History of the Earth. Thylacoleo was one strange mammal. A close relative of living koalas, kangaroos, and wombats, the largest species of Thylacoleo were lion-sized carnivores that stalked the Australian continent between 2 million and…
The whole of natural history fascinates me, but everyone has their own favorite topics, and one of the most intriguing subject areas (to me, at least) is predator/prey interactions. Herbivores are interesting in their own right, surely, but for me it is the predators that are the most thought-…
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