A Rocket of His Own

tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

TIME magazine recently went to interview astronomer Neil deGrasse Tyson and noticed a huge crate had been delivered to his office at the American Museum of Natural History. He was kind enough to open it on-camera. The back story of this gift is that Neil was adamant that ABC News include the Saturn V Rocket on its list of The 7 Wonders of America. The folks at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama were so grateful, they sent Neil a replica.

This video just goes to show that boys never really grow up, but their toys sure do [listen to the entire audio recording]

More like this

Neil deGrasse Tyson has a new book out: Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier. It is (as one might guess) about space exploration, and assembles earlier speeches and writings with some new stuff. This is an interesting time to be talking about the space program, as NASA seems to be…
Neil DeGrasse Tyson on CNN: And while we are on the topic, Carl Sagan, of the original Cosmos, on climate change: See also this from Chris Mooney at Mother Jones. And just for the heck of it, here's my interview with Neil deGrasse Tyson from 2011.
tags: education, public outreach, SciCafe, science cafe, AMNH, American Museum of Natural History, NYC, streaming video Who: A Conversation with AMNH Astronomer, Neil deGrasse TysonWhat: free public presentation, "Life, the Universe, and Everything"When: Wednesday, 2 June at 700pmWhere:…
tags: education, public outreach, SciCafe, science cafe, AMNH, American Museum of Natural History, NYC, streaming video Who: A Conversation with AMNH Astronomer, Neil deGrasse TysonWhat: free public presentation, "Life, the Universe, and Everything"When: Tonight at 700pmWhere: Gottesman Hall of…

-Space Geek Alert-
It's amusing that the model has the painted roll pattern for SA-500F, the non-flight Facilities Integration Test stack. :)

By the bug guy (not verified) on 20 Jul 2010 #permalink

I do so love his enthusiasm. His recent lectures at The Rose Center were fascinating, in part because of that irrepressible enthusiasm.

I love it! Despite being this big TV star and media personality, despite being this world-renowned astrophysicist and head of the Haden Planetarium and all, he is, at his heart, still the little nerd kid who gets a thrill out of big rocket ships.

That simple, child-like thrill is what still drives me in what I do. I too get to play with expensive toys just so I can make really cool looking space ships.

Neil is truly one of my heroes. A man of many accomplishments who still knows how to be a little kid; still in touch with that simple thrill to this day. I love this.

These guys are actually building their own rockets:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Suborbitals

Their first test launch is scheduled to take place about a month from now at sea off the coast of the Danish island Bornholm.

They built their own sea launch platform for that...

And they are going to tow the platform + rocket out from Copenhagen with their own submarine...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UC3_Nautilus

Their blog is well worth a look if you can read Danish/Norwegian/Swedish or if you can stomach a google translation:
http://ing.dk/blogs/rumfartpaadenandenmaade

By Peter Lund (not verified) on 26 Jul 2010 #permalink

No pun intended, but I love how down to Earth Neil is in his explanations. He really is an inspiration in how to communicate science to the general public.