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I am at a meeting at an undisclosed location, and concurrently the weak lensing folk are having a workshop on future surveys, so I am slumming at their sessions in my copious spare time. This morning Tony Tyson is leading a discussion on the technical aspects of the surveys, with LSST as the…
One of the overlooked findings of the Pew survey of U.S.-based scientists is that roughly 51% say that they either believe in God (33%) or a higher power (18%) and roughly 30% self-identify as Protestant (20%) or Catholic (10%). The findings cut against a commonly voiced claim by many outspoken…
From American Nones: The Profile of the No Religion Population: "Belonging" refers to people who self-identify as "X." For example, someone who asserts that they are an atheist. "Belief" refers to the content of one's avowed beliefs, as opposed to label. Someone who asserts that they "do not…
Lucy went on display today at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, and there was no way I could resist paying her a visit. I went in to the exhibit with very mixed feelings about it. A lot of people, including quite a few scientists I respect, have been extremely vocal in their opposition to the…

RE: 51% Of Self-Identified Republicans In Swing Districts Favor A Public Option

Would you favor or oppose the national government offering everyone the choice of a government administered health insurance plan â something like the Medicare coverage that people 65 and older get â that would compete with private health insurance plans?

Every poll that ends up with a result of large support for a public option has included the comparison to Medicare in the question. Since Medicare is single-payer, which the public option in any form would not be, that is a flawed comparison. I feel that it is just a way to sell the question, in other words, to push the poll.