All Mirror Neurons, All the Time

The last couple weeks have seen a flurry of papers on mirror neurons, with three in last week's issue of Current Biology, and the paper on mirror neurons and sexual orientation in press at NeuroImage (is it just me, or will that journal publish anything?) that is fast becoming infamous (see posts on it by the Neurocritic, at the new cognitive anthropology blog Alpha Psy, and at ScienceBlog's own Frontal Cortex). So, I'm declaring this the weekend of mirror neurons. I should have the first post up sometime tomorrow.

Oh, and if you want more pornographic neuroscience, check out this old post.

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I am a 1-1 paraprofessional working with a student(ASD) and he loves to watch hmself in mirrors or anthing that gives off his reflection. Also, he plays with his shadow. I have worked with him for close to 2 years and now as a reward and/or stress reducing device, he watches himself in an almost fulllength mirror as he is working on puzzles or with shapes.

He does make faces and loves to dance around anyways but, more so when he can see his reflection.

What can be done to improve his ASD issues in relationship to his social skills?

Thank you.

By Paul A. Campagna (not verified) on 10 Nov 2008 #permalink