Photo Synthesis

sb2

Myrmecos seems to have caught the eye of the editors at ScienceBlogs, and I've been contracted to inaugurate a new photography site for their network.  Photo Synthesis will be a rotating showcase of science imagery:

The internet is home to a wealth of captivating science images, from the many microscopic components of a cell to the remote corners of the universe captured by Hubble. On Photo Synthesis, we aim to bring you the best of what's out there. Every month we will feature the work of a different photoblogger, exposing worlds both small and large, familiar and exotic. We will let the power of the lens take us where we ourselves are not able to go.

Don't worry about changing your bookmarks- the Myrmecos Blog itself is staying right here in its happy home at wordpress.  For the month, though, posting will be lighter than normal.  I'll keep the myrmecology content here, but photography-related articles and images will go to Photo Synthesis.  Things should return to normal by mid-May.

http://scienceblogs.com/photosynthesis/

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Hello Science Blogs! I am Alex Wild, and insofar as Photo Synthesis is concerned, Mr. April. No centerfolds, fortunately for you. I normally blog elsewhere, but I am here at Photo Synthesis for the month and honored that the Science Blogs crew chose me as their inaugural photoblogger. I became a…
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This one is interesting - a blog with rotating hosts! The new blog, Photo Synthesis will rotate authors every month, each author using the blog to showcase some of their best science/nature photography. The first one to go is Alex Wild, who you may also know from his Myrmecos Blog. So go say Hello…

The particular photos and captions of your first post there are quite clever!

And thanks for the Camponotus termitarius photoessay.

Some day, ask me about an inquiline Camponotus that Buren collected in a C. termitarius mounds in Argentina, or seek it out at LACM.

By James C. Trager (not verified) on 10 Apr 2009 #permalink