Free online neuroscience vids

The Learner.org website has a large collection of video teaching modules for high school, college and adult students, including modules on the brain and mind.

The Brain module has 32 film clips, ranging in length from 5-20 minutes. They include films about Phineas Gage, the visual system, sensori-motor integration, the role of synaptic plasticity in learning, the brain's language centres and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions.

The 35 videos in the Mind module include films on brain mechanisms of pleasure and addiction, the role of the frontal lobes in cognition and awareness, language processing, aging and memory, mood disorders and phantom limb syndrome.

Free registration is required to gain access to all the resources on the site.

More like this

Four representations of Phineas Gage, from Macmillan, M. (2006). Restoring Phineas Gage: A 150th Retrospective. J. Hist. Neurosci. 9: 46-66. [Abstract] Here's some more neurohistory from the Beeb: following on from last week's episode of In Our Time, which featured a discussion about the…
PHINEAS GAGE (1823-1860) is one of the earliest documented cases of severe brain injury. Gage is the index case of an individual who suffered major personality changes after brain trauma. As such, he is a legend in the annals of neurology, which is largely based on the study of brain-damaged…
THE daguerreotype on the right is believed to be the only known image of railroad worker Phineas Gage, who was enshrined in the history of neuroscience one day in September, 1848, when a large iron rod he was using to tamp gunpowder into a hole in a rock caused an explosion and was propelled…
The only known photograph of famed head case Phineas Gage was discovered last month (on Flickr of all places!). Jack and Beverly Wilgus had the above daguerreotype for thirty years before realizing what it was. As they describe the image's history at their website: We called it "The Whaler"…

Thanks for pointing out this great site. What a terrific resource.

By carolyn13 (not verified) on 25 Sep 2007 #permalink

It's only available in the U.S. :(