Doctor Who Theme Song Accompanied by Tesla Coils

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The musical group, ArcAttack, constructed a set of Tesla Coils that they use to perform "an electrifying" live performance at Maker Faire 2010, held in San Mateo, California. Maker Faire is an event created by Make Magazine to "celebrate arts, crafts, engineering, science projects and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) mindset."

According to the filmographer, the HVDJ pumps music through a PA system while two specially designed DRSSTC's (Dual-Resonant Solid State Tesla Coils) act as separate synchronized instruments. These high tech machines produce an electrical arc similar to a continuous lightning bolt and put out a crisply distorted square wave sound reminiscent of the early days of synthesizers.

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Further evidence that science+music=awesome.

Definitely something not to try at home. The Tesla coils are deadly and these performers are protected. If you're lucky a low-power coil will simply give you nasty radio frequency burns but coils that throw out nice bright long sparks like that are killers. There aren't many recorded fatalities from these coils, but they're not exactly a common household item. They're quite impressive though. I've always wanted to build a solid state version but I'm too paranoid about someone else switching it on.

By MadScientist (not verified) on 30 May 2010 #permalink