A shark's perspective

Dr. Carl Meyer (University of Hawaii) and Dr. Katsufumi Sato (University of Tokyo) have teamed up to gather data about shark behavior in a rather interesting way. They flipped the animals upside down, which makes them relax, and strapped on cameras and instruments that will facilitate the creation of 3D models of shark movements. Using accelerometers, they are able to measure speed while magnetometers record the magnetic field and additional tools measure the water temperature and depth. The video is used to help contextualize these other data.

Sources:

University of Hawaii

National Geographic

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